EPISODE
215

Jeff Johnson

Millionaire Next Door

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We are rounding out our series today with a Penn State grad, a fellow Penn State grad. I’m very excited to introduce all of you to Jeff Johnson. He is a millionaire next-door at the ripe age of 37. He and his wife, Amanda, follow disciplined, pragmatic and balanced financial behaviors, and they’ve acquired a net worth of more than a million dollars. They live a rather modest lifestyle in a two-bedroom townhouse in New Jersey. They enjoy the simple life experiences with their family and friends.

Jeff and Amanda met while they were at Penn State University, similar to me and my husband. After graduating, they had a five-year long distance relationship. Amanda actually completed her doctorate of Clinical Psychology during that time frame and during the relationship while they were long distance, they had become each accustomed to certain conservative spending habits that they now continue to follow during their marriage. It’s really nice to find your financial soulmate. That’s Jeff and Amanda.

Since getting married nine years ago, they’ve been able to successfully eliminate all their debt including car loan and student loans. They do still have a modest mortgage and, as I said in the process, they have earned themselves over a million dollars. They reached that at age 34. They are 37 now. Jeff currently works at a pharmaceutical company. Amanda worked as a staff psychologist at a local college before taking a leave of absence to raise their 2-year-old son.

Some of the takeaways from our conversation with Jeff:

  • We go down memory lane and we talk about how he opened up his first bank account at nine and his first IRA at 18.
  • How he closely tracks his expenses and his investments; what tool does he use; how Jeff and Amanda avoid the “noise” to stay focused on their finances and how they don’t let outsiders influence their spending behaviors.
  • And, this is interesting, how to put things into a value context but still treat yourself. I don’t know when something is really worth it.

One of my favorite quotes from our interview: “We’re in control of our finances in our lives so we don’t let our finances control us” – Click to Tweet